Lecture missed mark on science of 5G technology

Wednesday I attended a lecture by professor Martin Pall about his view of 5G hazards. Among other things, we were told that the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection was little more than an industry organization. That’s misleading at best. ICNIRP is formally related to the World Health Organization. It’s 28-member international Science Expert Group has expertise spanning biology, epidemiology, physics, biophysics or medicine and consists of 16 with academic appointments, 11 from government laboratories and one from a non-5G industry. Check it out at https://www.icnirp.org/. Do they not deserve more than to be dismissed as an instrument of industry? Among other things, we were told that there were three suicides among ambulance personnel within 11 days of each other after the first 5G ambulance was put in service. But, we were not told why no such rash of suicides has occurred at the Super Bowl last weekend amid a large 5G rollout at the stadium. We were also told that it is “highly plausible” that 5G in Wuhan, China, was responsible for either the initiation or promotion of the Coronavirus. I think that this is quite a leap with no serious research behind it.

As an academic with 50 years experience in electromagnetic fields research, I seriously question Palls’ statements about the how phased arrays are used in 5G and about how (he claims) millimeter waves penetrate deeply into the human body. His latter statement cannot be justified in terms of Maxwell’s Equations which have formed the basis of electromagnetic theory for more than a hundred years.

I tried to raise these questions Wednesday, but after only two questions and with me in line for the next, the meeting was abruptly ended. We need a better, more complete discussion of the issues surrounding 5G.

Robert Olsen

Pullman

Rev. Wilson drives people way from the good news

According to the Feb. 5 Daily News, Rev. Doug Wilson told a University of Idaho audience that “everybody can agree that the Bible is sexist,” thus propping up his own sexist opinions.

Not everyone agrees with Rev. Wilson’s interpretation of the Bible. While it is true that one can find in it passages that support the normative sexism of the patriarchal cultures in which it was written, one can also find in it passages that expose and critique the oppression and violence that accompany sexist norms.

And one can find in the Bible evangelical passages that break down gender binaries and promote equality and inclusiveness.

It is unfortunate that Rev. Wilson uses his influence to keep people away from hearing the good news.

Walter Hesford

Moscow

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