Moscow families deserve better

On Wednesday, Dr. Greg Bailey, superintendent of the Moscow School District, hosted his second question-and-answer Zoom meeting regarding reopening of schools in our district in light of the coronavirus pandemic.

This meeting made it very clear that there is not yet a plan in place to safely reopen our schools. Rather, several options are still being considered. Parents at the meeting had dozens of totally reasonable questions that could not be answered because decisions have not yet been made.

The superintendent’s failure to produce a plan for fall school reopening in a timely fashion is a danger to our children, their teachers, the school staff and our entire community. It leaves parents in the dark as they struggle to guess at what the school situation will be in the fall so they can plan for work, childcare and their children’s education.

The families in the Moscow School District deserve better.

Gwen Barnes

Moscow

We’re fine in Grangeville, Stites

Here in Idaho County, we had Grangeville Border Days over the July 4th weekend and Stites Day the following Saturday. By now (according to media hysteria) we should have hundreds of resulting COVID-19 cases and deaths. We do not. I congratulate those in charge who made the difficult decision to proceed as usual with those events and those who attended and made the events successful.

We the people can make reasonable choices for ourselves at the local level without big brother’s interference. Thank you, Gov. Little for not pushing a one-size-fits-all program. We are not all Boise/Ada County. Let freedom and personal responsibility prevail. Thanks.

Lucky Brandt

Kooskia

Finding a new chip strategy

Now that his secret has been exposed, Bill Gates is going to have to find another way to inject a microchip into the world’s 7 billion people. Will it be hidden in Novacaine to be delivered during your next dental visit? Maybe it’ll be inserted into insulin shots or Advil capsules. Perhaps you’ll notice but ignore a feeling of a pinprick in a crowded room (post Covid of course). So many ways …

Here’s a few things you might not know about implantable microchips. 1) The smallest ones, about the size of a grain of rice can transmit only a few feet and do not have GPS because GPS requires a battery. 2) GPS chips with batteries are big and must be recharged (like your cell phone) frequently. You’d know it was there. 3) Tiny chips with GPS and a long battery life do not exist – but think of the value they would have economically and maybe even militarily if they did; 4) Implants can be removed.

I can think of a few reasons why one might not want to get the COVID-19 vaccine; at the top of the list is concern about the shortened timeline for testing and its safety. But it’s a shame that anyone would deny themselves a potentially life-saving vaccine due to unproven, sick conspiracy theories.

If an implant is your concern, there are steps you can take. 1) Insist on being able to take the vaccine anonymously; or bring some fake ID. The chip will be meaningless without being able to tie it to an individual. 2) Draw a circle around your arm and insist the vaccine be given there. Immediately have it removed.

In the meantime, I’m going to look to invest in a microchip implant detection and removal company. There’s some money to be made there.

Mary Hoffman

Colton

Mask up, Moscow

“No shirt, No shoes, No service” and “This establishment reserves the right to refuse service to anyone” policies have been in place in many businesses for years. They are in place to protect the health and safety of both the patrons and the staff. Is this a violation of my Constitutional rights? No.

The only reason the mask resolution is in place is to protect the health and safety of both the patrons and the staff in places of business. The mask helps the wearer slow down the spread of COVID-19. Anyone can be an unknowing (asymptomatic) carrier of the virus. Is this a violation of my Constitutional rights? No.

The goal is to slow the spread of COVID-19, not eradicate it. By slowing it down our local hospitals and health care officials can help those who do contract COVID-19 and give laboratories time to find an effective vaccine.

If our area continues to see more cases, the few ICU units and ventilators available will be overburdened and unable to help those who will need it.

Mask up, Moscow.

Kathy Weber

Moscow

Prisons and drug prohibition

In her letter of July 27, Kathy Warren lays out moral, practical and legal reasons to not spend $130 million Idaho tax dollars on the construction of a new prison. May I add a possible economic reason?

I’m hearing that America will soon end its drug prohibition. When that happens, there will be an instant fall in crime and violence. Stockholders in America’s for-profit prisons will suffer a fall in share value. Idaho might find its new prison operation at partial capacity; money wasted, not recoverable.

Wiley Hollingsworth

Pullman

Schools need adequate funding

The Invest in Idaho Initiative started by Reclaim Idaho addresses what we need to do for the children of our great state — to put money into our free and public school system.

Please sign the petition that will put the initiative on the ballot for the November election. Reach out to friends and family in Grangeville, Orofino, Lewiston, Cottonwood, Wallace and Kellogg. Tell them to go to ReclaimIdaho.org. Signatures are being collected in the secure portal of DocuSign.

Let’s make sure that all school districts are equally funded across the state. This initiative requires no increase in property taxes.

From the FAQ at reclaimidaho.org, look at how this funding will be used: 1. Reduction of class sizes and prevention class size increases; 2. Attraction and retention of highly qualified teachers and support staff (this includes competitive salaries as well as continuing education opportunities and support for new educators); 3. Current and adequate classroom materials, such as textbooks and supplies for students; 4. Career technical education; 5. Full-day kindergarten; 6. Art, music and drama programs; and 7. Special education services.

Kathryn Bonzo

Moscow

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