Answer is in the wind

Once again the ugliest side of humanity, inherent racism, is getting behooved attention and perhaps resolution.

Alas, it is not the first time nor will it be the last I am afraid. Dylan’s words written in 1962 do not ring hollow. And they are:

How many roads must a man walk down / Before you call him a man? / Yes, ’n’ how many seas must a white dove sail / Before she sleeps in the sand? / Yes, ’n’ how many times must the cannonballs fly / Before they’re forever banned? / The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind / The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

How many years can a mountain exist / Before it’s washed to the sea? / Yes, ’n’ how many years can some people exist / Before they’re allowed to be free? / Yes, ’n’ how many times can a man turn his head / Pretending he just doesn’t see? / The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind / The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

How many times must a man look up / Before he can see the sky? / Yes, ’n’ how many ears must one man have / Before he can hear people cry? / Yes, ’n’ how many deaths will it take till he knows / That too many people have died? / The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind / The answer is blowin’ in the wind.

Nancy Maxeiner

Viola

A few bad apples?

I grew up on a small dairy farm in rural southwestern Washington. At that time, farmers grew and put up most of their own food. It was also the case that produce had seasons. For example, asparagus was only available in April and May and if you wanted it any other time of the year you had to can it yourself.

Similarly, most farms had a root cellar where you stored things like varieties of winter squash, potatoes, turnips, carrots and apples. To store apples, you got some barrels and saw dust and then you picked through your apples throwing out the bad ones. Next, you put a layer of sawdust into the barrel and a layer of apples and so on until you have filled the barrel.

During the fall and winter, you would periodically take apples into the house and also check your barrel for rotten apples. You did this because if you didn’t get them out soon, your whole barrel of apples would be rotten. Thus, the original saying, One bad apple can spoil the whole barrel. However, if you were vigilant, your apples would last until spring. We need to be vigilant that “a few bad apples” don’t rot our police departments.

Thomas Brigham

Pullman

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